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Peace and Nonviolence

More on Peace and Nonviolence

May 18, 2012 Press Release

WASHINGTON--Long-time peace advocate, Rep. John Lewis scored a victory today by gaining the inclusion of his Cost of War Act H.R. 3088 as an amendment passed en bloc as part of the Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013.  The Congressman made this statement on the House floor in support of his amendment today:

April 27, 2012 Press Release

WASHINGTON--Today Rep. John Lewis encouraged members of the House to vote against H.R. 3523, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA). He joined many other civil liberties, entertainment, and cyber privacy organizations in opposing the bill.  The bill would allow organizations like the National Security Agency (NSA) or the Department of Defense Cyber Command to share data it collects on American citizens with private industry or other government agencies without restriction.

March 22, 2012 Press Release

Rep. John Lewis made this statement about the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida:  

“This shooting is a tragedy.  It reminds me too much of what happened in the 1930s, 40s and 50s in this country when thousands of people of color were murdered without impunity simply because their lives were thought to be cheap. The death of Trayvon Martin has a chilling effect on black parents and their children, especially their sons.

February 29, 2012 Press Release

WASHINGTON—Today Rep. John Lewis participated in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol where a marker was unveiled to honor the contributions of slave laborers to the U.S. Capitol.  The following is his statement:

February 28, 2012 Press Release

Yesterday Rep. John Lewis attended a ceremony at the White House where President Barack Obama introduced his new initiative, My Brother's Keeper, a White House program serving young African American men and boys.  Rep. Lewis made these comments:

January 21, 2009 Editorial
The inauguration of Barack Obama, the first African-American president of the United States, is a sign. It is a symbol of progress we never even imagined was possible during the civil-rights movement. And we were dreamers. We truly believed that through the power of nonviolent action we could actually build a beloved community, a nation at peace with itself. But never in my wildest imagination did I ever believe I would see this day.

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